Well then...

itsmemacleod:

did anyone else have trouble waterbending last night?

If you hold back on the emotions- if you don’t allow yourself to go all the way through them- you can never get to being detached, you’re too busy being afraid. You’re afraid of the pain, you’re afraid of the grief. You’re afraid of the vulnerability that loving entails. But by throwing yourself into these emotions, by allowing yourself to dive in, all the way, over your head even, you experience them fully and completely. You know what pain is. You know what love is. You know what grief is. And only then can you say, ‘All right. I have experienced that emotion. I recognize that emotion. Now I need to detach from that emotion for a moment.’
"Tuesday’s with Morrie" by Mitch Albom (via t3nd3r0ni)

egobus:

image

me as a teacher tbh

ruinedchildhood:

when mom says dinners ready

ruinedchildhood:

when mom says dinners ready

h0odrich:

gymleaderkarkat:


What are you so afraid of!?

I’m REALLY sorry but it looks like they’re about to rap battle


'ginger princess but my bow long, make a snowman was a wack song…'

h0odrich:

gymleaderkarkat:

What are you so afraid of!?

I’m REALLY sorry but it looks like they’re about to rap battle

'ginger princess but my bow long, make a snowman was a wack song…'

I think a huge mistake we make is not allowing ourselves to feel. Whenever I’m driving in my car and a memory pops into my head that forms a lump in my throat my first instinct is the immediately shut it away. But I try to force myself to feel it, the loss. I let myself cry and slam my fists into the steering wheel because I know my mind needs my body. Sometimes the spaces in our head aren’t big enough for the pain we feel and it’s our bodies job to set it free.
Jenna Anne. (via escapetosunsets)

sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 

Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick

These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 

I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.

This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 

These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 

X

heros-of-the-bluebox:

sluttyoliveoil:

cough

rough

though

through

why dont these words rhyme

but for some god forsaken reason pony and bologna do

Babe, there’s something tragic about you
something so magic about you
don’t you agree

Babe, there’s something lonesome about you
something so wholesome about you
Get closer to me

no tight side, no rolling eyes, no irony
no ‘who cares’, no vacant stares, no time for me